Stayin Sharp with Evan Sharpley. Notre Dame, Navy move game to Annapolis for first time in history

Notre Dame, Navy move game to Annapolis for first time in history

First, I’d like to say that I stand with and support those opposed to social injustice and racism. Love your neighbor as yourself applies to all races. And as we are all human, we should love each as such. Having grown up playing sports, I’ve learned what it’s like to be on a team. Most of those teams consisted of people with differing backgrounds, social economic status, race, and religion. At Notre Dame, I was part of a diverse collection of individuals from across the country. On our football team, we poured sweat together, we bled together. We didn’t always get along, but we loved each other. More than ever, we need that love in this world. Love that doesn’t discriminate. Listen to each other. Love on each other. Support each other.

With that said, here are a few updates in the sports world, both in community and across the country:

Notre Dame Football

Were you planning on going to Ireland to watch the Irish play Navy? Well, amid the global pandemic, the powers that be made the call to move venues. Both Notre Dame and Navy consulted at length with the Irish government, as well as medical authorities to decide that the Aug. 29 game at Aviva Stadium in Dublin Ireland will not be played.

However, it will still take place in Annapolis, Maryland, at the Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium. The 94th-consecutive game of the longest-continuous-intersectional rivalry in the country will likely be played Labor Day weekend (Saturday or Sunday) and be televised nationally by ESPN or ABC. The scheduled meeting in Annapolis will mark the first time Notre Dame visits Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium in the 94-year span of the rivalry.

“Our student-athletes have had great experiences competing in Ireland and are very disappointed not to be returning to Dublin in 2020,” said Jack Swarbrick, Vice President and James E. Rohr Director of Athletics at Notre Dame. “The change of venue has been a very difficult decision for our colleagues at the Naval Academy, but we are in full support of their choice. We are also grateful for everything our partners in Ireland have done to make this a smooth transition. We look forward to going back to Ireland for a game in the not too distant future.”

“We are obviously disappointed not to be traveling to Ireland this August,” said Naval Academy Director of Athletics Chet Gladchuk. “But, as expected, our priority must be ensuring the health and safety of all involved. I am expecting that we will still be able to play Notre Dame as our season opener, but there is still much to be determined by health officials and those that govern college football at large. Once we have a definitive plan in place, we will announce the specifics pertaining to the game.”

“College football is one of the greatest spectacles in world sport and we had been thoroughly looking forward to welcoming Navy and Notre Dame here this summer for the first game of the Aer Lingus College Football Classic Series,” said Irish Taoiseach (Prime Minister) Leo Varadkar.

“Unfortunately, due to circumstances beyond our control, that is now not possible, but we hope to see both universities return to Aviva Stadium in the coming years. I want to personally thank both Chet Gladchuk and Jack Swarbrick for their efforts to bring the game to Ireland and we hope to welcome both teams back in the near future”

Both programs will continue to work closely with the event organizers to plan for a return to Ireland in the coming years. Information on ticket refunds will be forthcoming.

MLB

Major League Baseball has rejected the players' offer for a 114-game regular season with no additional salary cuts and told the union it did not plan to make a counterproposal, sources confirmed to ESPN.

Players made their proposal Sunday, up from an 82-game regular season in management's offer last week. Opening Day would be June 30, and the regular season would end Oct. 31, nearly five weeks after the Sept. 27 conclusion that MLB's proposal stuck to from the season's original schedule.

MLB told the union it had no interest in extending the season into November, when it fears a second wave of the coronavirus could disrupt the postseason and jeopardize $787 million in broadcast revenue.

While management has suggested it could play a short regular season of about 50 games with no more salary reductions, it has not formally proposed that concept. Earlier this week, multiple players told ESPN that they would not abide a shorter schedule, with one saying, "We want to play more games, and they want to play less. We want more baseball."

NBA

The NBA's board of governors intends to approve a league proposal on a 22-team format to restart the season in Orlando, Florida, sources told ESPN.

Commissioner Adam Silver and the league's advisory/finance committee have shared the broad details of a plan with teams to play at the Walt Disney World Resort, sources said. The plan includes 13 Western Conference teams and nine Eastern Conference teams, eight regular-season games, a possible play-in tournament for the eighth seed, and playoffs, sources said.

The NBA is planning to have uniform, daily testing for the coronavirus within the Disney campus environment, sources told ESPN. ESPN is owned by The Walt Disney Company.

If a player tests positive for the virus, the league's intent would be to remove that player from the team to quarantine and treat individually -- and continue to test other team members as they play on, sources said.

As always, stay safe out there. Love each other. Stay Sharp!

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